The Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health is a network of professionals and people with lived experience of homelessness, hosted by Pathway.

Members of the Faculty carry out research into their work and share their findings to help improve and evidence the effectiveness of homeless healthcare. If you would like your work listed on these pages please contact us.

Recent Publications

Inclusion Health Service Standards for Commissioners and Service Providers (version 3)
Mental Health Service Interventions for People Sleeping Rough
Appendix 1 – Autism Spectrum Disorders and Consideration of Mental Capacity
Mental Capacity Act Screening Tool
Mental Health Act Screening Tool
Hospital Homelessness Mental Health Admission Plan
What works in inclusion health: overview of effective interventions for marginalised and excluded populations
Morbidity and mortality in homeless individuals, prisoners, sex workers, and individuals with substance use disorders in high-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Working with Homelessness – Standards for GP Receptionists in Primary Care
Manchester Homeless Health Needs Audit 2016
Socially Inclusive Dentistry – Executive Summary of the 1st National Conference
Turning Virchow upside down: medicine is politics on a smaller scale
Highway House – A 1:5 Social Return on Investment
Turning Virchow Upside Down
Inclusion Health Clinical Audit 2015-16 – Patient Audit
Inclusion Health Clinical Audit 2015-16 – Organisational Audit
2014 International Symposium Report


The Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health Service Standards for Commissioners and Service Providers, version 3

March 2018: Pathway & the Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health

The latest Service Standards for Commissioners and Service Providers reviews and builds upon previous versions, and includes preparatory material for the Homelessness Reduction Act ‘duty to refer’. The standards were compiled by a wide range of Faculty members, with expertise in a variety of areas. The document has been submitted to a number of professional bodies and Royal Colleges for endorsement. Please contact us if you would like to contribute to future editions.

Read more about the standards and download the latest version 


Mental Health Service Interventions for People Sleeping Rough

November 2017

In 2013 Pathway worked with The Greater London Authority, Lambeth Council, South London and the Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Thames Reach to publish new tools and guidance to help outreach workers supporting people sleeping rough. The publication includes practical tools guiding workers through the use of the Mental Capacity Act and Mental Health Act.  It has been regularly updated to include statutory changes. The tools and guidance are for practical use for everyone who works with clients or patients on the streets.  The Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health endorsed this work  to help us all respond better to the needs of vulnerable people on the street.

Download the guidance – Mental Health Service Interventions for People Sleeping Rough
Mental Capacity Act Screening Tool
Mental Health Act Screening Tool
Hospital Homelessness Mental Health Admission Plan
Appendix 1 – Autism Spectrum Disorders and Consideration of Mental Capacity


What works in inclusion health: overview of effective interventions for marginalised and excluded populations

November 2017

Inclusion health is a service, research, and policy agenda that aims to prevent and redress health and social inequities among the most vulnerable and excluded populations. This evidence synthesis of health and social interventions for inclusion health target populations, including people with experiences of homelessness, drug use, imprisonment, and sex work was first published in The Lancet, by researchers including Pathway Fellows and Secretary to the Faculty, Dr Nigel Hewett. Inclusion Health populations often have multiple overlapping risk factors and extreme levels of morbidity and mortality. The paper identifies numerous interventions to improve physical and mental health, and substance use; however, evidence is scarce for structural interventions, including housing, employment, and legal support that can prevent exclusion and promote recovery. It concludes that dedicated resources and better collaboration with the affected populations are needed to realise the benefits of existing interventions. Research must inform the benefits of early intervention and implementation of policies to address the upstream causes of exclusion, such as adverse childhood experiences and poverty. This paper is free to access, but you will need to register for a Lancet account.

What works in inclusion health: overview of effective interventions for marginalised and excluded populations


Morbidity and mortality in homeless individuals, prisoners, sex workers, and individuals with substance use disorders in high-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

November 2017

Inclusion health focuses on people in extremely poor health due to poverty, marginalisation, and multimorbidity. This open access research, published in The Lancet, with researchers including a Pathway fellow and a Pathway Trustee, aimed to review morbidity and mortality data on four overlapping populations who experience considerable social exclusion: homeless populations, individuals with substance use disorders, sex workers, and imprisoned individuals. It found that these groups experience extreme health inequities across a wide range of health conditions, with the relative effect of exclusion being greater in female individuals than male individuals. It recommend that the high heterogeneity between studies should be explored further using improved data collection in population subgroups and calls for intensive cross-sectoral policy and service action to prevent exclusion and improve health outcomes in individuals who are already marginalised.

Morbidity and mortality in homeless individuals, prisoners, sex workers, and individuals with substance use disorders in high-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis


Working with Homelessness – Standards for GP Receptionists

March 2017

Primary Care is the first point of contact for most people with a health problem, but many people who are homeless struggle to access a GP. Pathway has worked with receptionists and the Care Quality Commission to produce simple best practice guidelines for working with this group. This guidance is designed to operate alongside the E-learning package for GP Receptionists.

Working with Homelessness – Standards for GP Receptionists in Primary Care


Manchester Homeless Health Needs Audit 2016

January 2017

In Manchester there has been a significant increase in the number of reported rough sleepers in the last 5 years. This audit brings together data from services working with homeless people in the area and makes recommendations for the future development of support services to meet the needs found.

Manchester Homeless Health Needs Audit 2016


Socially Inclusive Dentistry – Executive Summary of the 1st National Conference

November 2016

In November 2016, over 100 dentistry professionals, academics and social care workers gathered for the first national conference on socially inclusive dentistry, focused on excluded groups and marginalised communities, includes people experiencing homelessness, Gypsies and Travellers, people involved in the sex industry and vulnerable migrants. The event explored barriers to services, and ways to overcome these in future education, research and commissioning.  Produced by Andrew Dickenson and Janine Doughty on behalf of NHS Health Education England, this executive summary reflects the breadth of discussion during the event and summarises the key learning and action points.

Socially Inclusive Dentistry – Executive Summary of the 1st National Conference


Highway House – A Social Return on Investment Report

July 2016

Highway House is a support service in East London for homeless people with no recourse to public funds, who are facing destitution. This research from Marcello Bertotti, Senior Research Fellow at Institute for Health and Human Development, University of East London found that for every pound invested in Highway House £5 – £8 of social benefit were generated.
Highway House – A Social Return on Investment Report


Turning Virchow upside down: medicine is politics on a smaller scale

July 2016

‘Upstream medicine’ considers the wider life of patients and considers the social determinants of health and the causes of the causes of illness. This paper, inspired by Professor Aidan Halligan, shortly before his death, examines approaches by Pathway, Well North and Upstream, a Canadian health organisation.
Turning Virchow upside down: medicine is politics on a smaller scale


Inclusion Health Clinical Audit 2015-16

December 2015: The Faculty of Homeless and Inclusion Health In Partnership with the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, and the Royal College of Physicians

Homelessness is estimated to have increased by 40% over the past 4 years, with homeless patients being nearly 5 times more likely to attend Emergency Departments than housed people. It is essential that staff are able to respond to the needs of this patient group. 23 Departments chose to take part in a 6 week pilot clinical audit, analysing organisational and patient responses to homelessness, in the first study of its kind.
Inclusion Health Clinical Audit 2015-16 – Patient Audit
Inclusion Health Clinical Audit 2015-16 – Organisational Audit


2014 International Symposium Report

Aug 2014: Pathway
This short report written by Helen Davies and Stan Burridge on behalf of the Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health looks at the 2014 International Symposium and takes a closer look at the thoughts and feeling of the Experts by Experience who attended.
2014 International Symposium Report


The Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health Service Standards for Commissioners and Service Providers. (version 2)

January 2014: Pathway & the Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health.

The National Inclusion Health Board at the Department of Health commissioned a new set of Standards from the Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health.  These updated Standards have been revised to reflect the new commissioning landscape and the new statutory duty under the Health and Social Care Act 2012 to “have regard to health inequalities”. We have also extended the Standards to include Gypsies and Travellers, vulnerable migrants and sex workers as well as homeless people.

We want to thank all the many members of the Faculty, both professionals and service users who contributed to these improved Standards. We welcome any suggestions for further improvement in future editions.


The Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health Service Standards for Commissioners and Service Providers.

May 2011, Pathway & the Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health.

This is the first comprehensive set of standards for health services for homeless people.  Pathway is publishing this document in partnership with the Faculty for Homeless and Inclusion Health.  This is version one of a document we expect to expand and amend over time.  Comments on the document are welcome. For help and support implementing the Standards please contact us.